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Wednesday, 22 March 2017

Slow Wi-Fi ? This new crazy-fast infrared network cracks 40Gbps

To escape the constraints of radio for Wi-Fi transmission in the home, researchers have turned to infrared to create a new system that exceeds 40Gbps capacity, which you could keep all to yourself.
The system, developed by researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology, beams infrared light from an optical fiber to devices using an array of ceiling-mounted 'light antennas'.

Tuesday, 21 March 2017

Charge inside a room WITHOUT having chargers or power bank ...Interesting!



સંબંધિત છબીNo need to worry if there are less or at the worst no plug-ins inside the room...still you can
charge your electronic devices on the go. And though some devices can already be charged without wires, researchers at The Walt Disney Company have recently supersized the technology by building a wireless "charging room."
Scientists at a branch of The Walt Disney Company called Disney Research have converted an entire room into a wireless charger that can boost the batteries of 10 objects at one time.With so much capacity i.e. of charging 10 devices in a room it can be really fruitful for public,private or no matter  for what purpose .In today's time  almost no work is possible without gadgets and to keep them running they too need their food i.e power in sense of charging for their working. The researchers said they were inspired by inventor Nikola Tesla, who created the first system to wirelessly transmit electricity — the Tesla coil.
Tesla believed there could be a global network of wireless electricity that would use an electromagnetic wave that reverberated between the ionosphere (a layer of the Earth's atmosphere filled with ions and free electrons) and the ground .While Tesla's vision didn't come to fruition, Sample and his colleagues were inspired to investigate how wireless charging could be set up in large spaces. It will be no less than  a three-dimensional charging experience, where one can walk into any living room or office and their cellphone is charged simply by walking in. Sample stated-we have a metalized room, and we're going to use standing electromagnetic waves that reverberate all around this room, providing wireless power to any devices inside.
Methadology works as -Known as quasistatic cavity resonance (QSCR), the wireless charging technology uses electromagnetic fields generated by electrical currents. Disney Research's room is outfitted with aluminum-paneled walls and a centrally located copper pole that houses 15 capacitors (which store electrical energy, as batteries do). As the capacitors generate electrical currents, they travel through the ceiling, walls and floor, and then back through the pole. These electrical currents create the electromagnetic fields that circulate around the pole and wirelessly charge devices in the room which relieves us from tension of carrying charger with us all the time and also reduce the need of finding plug-ins.

Sunday, 19 March 2017

IBM fit an entire bit of data on a magnet made with a single atom



This isn't yet practical, but IBM has just taken a big step towards improving computing technology: IBM researchers just discovered a way to store data on a single atom.

Data storage is undergoing dramatic evolution, recently researchers successfully stored digital data — an entire operating system, a movie, an Amazon gift card, a study and a computer virus — in strands of DNA

The IBM Research results announced Wednesday that the researchers have developed the world's smallest magnet using a single atom and they packed it with one bit of digital data.

Currently, hard drives use about 100,000 atoms to store a single bit of information — a 1 or 0 — using traditional methods.

Saturday, 18 March 2017

Now attackers can use sound to hack your device:New smartphone threat

Don't assume you can trust the hardware sensors in your phone and other connected devices.

Resently found that a malicious music file can trick an accelerometer into giving false readings.Researchers from the University of Michigan and the University of South Carolina have revealed a handful of sonic hacks on sensors that might not seem dangerous today, but do show one more way that hackers could use the Internet of Things to cause physical harm.

Thursday, 16 March 2017

Difference Between HDD & SSD

   SSD Vs HDD

Most people now buy laptops for their computing needs and have to make the decision between getting either a Solid State Drive (SSD) or Hard Disk Drive (HDD) as the storage component.  So which of the two is the better choice, an SSD or HDD? There’s no straight-forward answer to this question; each buyer has different needs and you have to evaluate the decision based on those needs, your preferences, and of course budget. Even though the price of SSDs has been falling, the price per gigabyte advantage is still strongly with HDDs. Yet, if performance and fast bootup is your primary consideration and money is secondary, then SSD is the way to go. For the remainder of this article, we will make a comparison of SSD and HDD storage and go over the good, the bad, and the ugly of both.


What is an SSD?

We’ll make no assumptions here and keep this article on a level that anyone can understand. You might be shopping for a computer and simply wondering what the heck SSD actually means? To begin, SSD stands for Solid State Drive. You’re probably familiar with USB memory sticks - SSD can be thought of as an oversized and more sophisticated version of the humble USB memory stick. Like a memory stick, there are no moving parts to an SSD. Rather, information is stored in microchips.  Conversely, a hard disk drive uses a mechanical arm with a read/write head to move around and read information from the right location on a storage platter. This difference is what makes SSD so much faster. As an analogy, what’s quicker? Having to walk across the room to retrieve a book to get information or simply magically having that book open in front of you when you need it? That’s how an HDD compares to an SSD; it simply requires more physical labor (mechanical movement) to get information.
A typical SSD uses what is called NAND-based flash memory. This is a non-volatile type of memory. What does non-volatile mean you ask? The simple answer is that you can turn off the disk and it won’t “forget” what was stored on it. This is of course an essential characteristic of any type of permanent memory. During the early days of SSD, rumors floated around saying stored data would wear off and be lost after only a few years.  Regardless, that rumor is certainly not true with today’s technology, as you can read and write to an SSD all day long and the data storage integrity will be maintained for well over 200 years. In other words, the data storage life of an SSD can outlive you!
An SSD does not have a mechanical arm to read and write data, it instead relies on an embedded processor (or “brain”) called a controller to perform a bunch of operations related to reading and writing data. The controller is a very important factor in determining the speed of the SSD. Decisions it makes related to how to store, retrieve, cache and clean up data can determine the overall speed of the drive. We won’t get into the nitty-gritty details for the various tasks it performs such as error correction, read and write caching, encryption, and garbage collection to name a few. Yet, suffice to say, good controller technology is often what separates an excellent SSD from a good one. An example of a fast controller today is the SandForce SATA 3.0 (6GB/s) SSD controller that supports burst speeds up to 550MB/s read and write speeds. The next gen SandForce 3700 family of controllers was announced in late 2013, and is quoted to reach a blistering 1,800MB/s read/write sequential speeds as well as 150K/80K random IOPS.
Finally, you may be wondering what an SSD looks like and how easy it is to replace a hard drive with an after-market device. If you look at the images below, you’ll see the top and undersides of a typically-sized 2.5” SSD. The technology is encased inside either a plastic or metal case and looks like nothing more than what a battery might:
    SSD Top View                                                 

SSD Top View                                                         SSD Bottom View









The form factor of the SSD is actually the same as a regular hard drive. It comes in a standard 1.8”, 2.5”, or 3.5” size that can fit into the housing and connectors for the same-sized hard drives. The connector used for these standard sizes is SATA. There are smaller SSDs available that use what’s called mini-SATA (mSATA) and fit into the mini-PCI Express slot of a laptop.

What is a HDD?

Hard Disk Drives, or HDD in techno-parlance, have been around for donkey's years relative to the technology world. HDDs were first introduced by IBM in 1956 - yes folks this is nearly 60-year old technology, thank goodness vacuum tubes for TVs didn’t last so long! An HDD uses magnetism to store data on a rotating platter. A read/write head floats above the spinning platter reading and writing data. The faster the platter spins, the faster an HDD can perform. Typical laptop drives today spin at either 5400 RPM (Revolutions per Minute) or 7200RPM, though some server-based platters spin at up to 15,000 RPM!
The major advantage of an HDD is that it is capable of storing lots of data cheaply. These days, 1 TeraByte (1,024 gigabytes) of storage is not unusual for a laptop hard drive, and the density continues to grow. However, the cost per gigabyte is hard to calculate now-a-days since there are so many classes to consider, though it is safe to say that all HDDs are substantially cheaper than SSDs. As a comparison, the popular WD Black (1TB) goes for roughly $69 on most websites while the OCZ Trion 100 (960GB) and Samsung 850 EVO (1TB) SSDs go for $199 and $319 respectively, three to five times the price of the WD Black. So if you want cheap storage and lots of it, using a standard hard drive is definitely the more appealing way to go.
When it comes to appearance, HDDs essentially look the same from the outside as SSDs. HDDs predominantly use SATA interface. The most common size for laptop hard drives is the 2.5” form factor while a larger 3.5” form factor is used in desktop computers. The larger size allows for more platters inside and thus more storage capacity. Some desktop hard drives can store up to 6TB of data! Below is an example of what an HDD looks like using the Hitachi Deskstar 7K4000 4TB hard drive:                 



HDD Top View

HDD Bottom View

SSD Vs HDD Comparison

Now it’s time to do some comparisons and determine which might be best for your individual needs - SSD or HDD?  The best way to compare items is a table with a side by side comparison of items in which a green box indicates an advantage:   
                            
AttributeSSD (Solid State Drive)HDD (Hard Disk Drive)
Power Draw / Battery LifeLess power draw, averages 2 – 3 watts, resulting in 30+ minute battery boostMore power draw, averages 6 – 7 watts and therefore uses more battery
CostExpensive, roughly $0.20 per gigabyte (based on buying a 1TB drive)Only around $0.03 per gigabyte, very cheap (buying a 4TB model)
CapacityTypically not larger than 1TB for notebook size drives; 4TB max for desktopsTypically around 500GB and 2TB maximum for notebook size drives; 10TB max for desktops
Operating System Boot TimeAround 10-13 seconds average bootup timeAround 30-40 seconds average bootup time
NoiseThere are no moving parts and as such no soundAudible clicks and spinning can be heard
VibrationNo vibration as there are no moving partsThe spinning of the platters can sometimes result in vibration
Heat ProducedLower power draw and no moving parts so little heat is producedHDD doesn’t produce much heat, but it will have a measurable amount more heat than an SSD due to moving parts and higher power draw
Failure RateMean time between failure rate of 2.0 million hoursMean time between failure rate of 1.5 million hours
File Copy / Write SpeedGenerally above 200 MB/s and up to 550 MB/s for cutting edge drivesThe range can be anywhere from 50 – 120MB / s
EncryptionFull Disk Encryption (FDE) Supported on some modelsFull Disk Encryption (FDE) Supported on some models
File Opening SpeedUp to 30% faster than HDDSlower than SSD
Magnetism Affected?An SSD is safe from any effects of magnetismMagnets can erase data


Tuesday, 14 March 2017

What is the difference between state-backed hackers and cybercrime gangs?

Organised cybercrime is now as sophisticated as any government-backed hacking group and businesses are losing the fight against both.
Cybercriminal groups are more organised than ever. Many of the most sophisticated groups operate as if they were a legitimate internet software company and they're rivalling the capabilities of even the most highly drilled state-sponsored hacking group. The distinction between state-sponsored actors and hacking gangs no longer exists.

Sunday, 12 March 2017

Machine learning will boost the enterprise user experience

Machine learning
Many of the applications running today's enterprises are not built to help organizations understand or improve the user experiences of their customers. New types of intelligence -- in the form of machine learning behind the scenes -- may help put data to use in boosting the custumer experience and user experience.
The internet leaders -- the Googles and Amazons of the world -- have brought together application designers and data scientists to further their user experiences through predictive analytics, Gualtieri continued. "Google and the internet giants think of this all the time. Customer experience professionals can do the greatest job in the world, but they're not thinking about how to create cognitive logic within applications, and they.re not going to create intelligent

Thursday, 2 March 2017

Microsoft to discontinue Skype Wi-Fi as end of march

Microsoft is discontinuing its Skype Wi-Fi service globally at the end of March, with officials citing a desire to focus on "core" features as the reason.
Microsoft is discontinuing Skype Wi-Fi as of March 31, as reported earlier today by TechCrunch.               
                            

Wednesday, 1 March 2017

Android ransomware attacks :-


Ransomware targeting Android users has increased by over 50 percent in just a year.This, the highest number of attempts to infect Android smartphones and tablets with malicious file-encrypting software so far, comes as users increasingly turn to mobiles as their primary devices, storing more and more valuable data on them.

Tuesday, 28 February 2017

4 Surprising Linux Security Issues You Should Be Aware Of

You left Windows behind because of security issues. The sensible option was to move to Linux, famously more secure. But is it as secure as you think it is?
Throughout 2016 we’ve learned of a whole new dimension to Linux. Security threats can occur just as they do for Windows. While old-fashioned viruses might not be a problem on Linux, Trojans, ransomware, and browser security are all issues that you need to be aware of.
So, what are these threats? Let’s take a look.